Monday thru Thursday 10 am - 6 pm , Friday 10am - 3pm, Sunday 9am-2pm

Cart

Your Cart is Empty

Back To Shop

D. G. Hart

Showing all 2 results

  • Damning Words : The Life And Religious Times Of H. L. Mencken

    $28.99

    Recounts a famously outspoken agnostic’s surprising relationship with Christianity

    H. L. Mencken (1880-1956) was a reporter, literary critic, editor, author-and a famous American agnostic. From his role in the Scopes Trial to his advocacy of science and reason in public life, Mencken is generally regarded as one of the fiercest critics of Christianity in his day.

    In this biography D. G. Hart presents a provocative, iconoclastic perspective on Mencken’s life. Even as Mencken vividly debunked American religious ideals, says Hart, it was Christianity that largely framed his ideas, career, and fame. Mencken’s relationship to the Christian faith was at once antagonistic and symbiotic.

    Using plenty of Mencken’s own words, Damning Words superbly portrays an influential figure in twentieth-century America and, at the same time, casts telling new light on his era.

    Add to cart
  • Religious Advocacy And American History A Print On Demand Title

    $28.99

    To what extent does the culture of the modern research university harbor and nurture a bias against religion? Some scholars believe that the academy inconsistently excludes personal religious convictions while welcoming most other kinds of personal beliefs such as those concerning gender, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Others says that religion in the university is thriving and point to the proliferation of religious studies programs and the mounting literature on religion in the social sciences and humanities.

    Related to the question of academic bias against religion is the degree to which teaching about religion is a form of religious advocacy. Some believe that even though teaching about religion is necessary to understand human experience, such teaching often borders on advocacy if the dogmatic, intolerant, and unreasonable nature of religion is not acknowledged. Others answer that if professors may advocate other ideologies – whether political, cultural, or economic – that are fairly partisan, then religion should not be treated differently.

    Religious Advocacy and American History explores the general question of bias and objectivity in higher learning from the perspective of the role of religious convictions in the study of American history. The contributors to this book, many of whom are leading historians of American religion and culture, address primarily two related questions. First, how do personal religious convictions influence one’s own research, writing, and teaching? And, second, what place should personal beliefs have within American higher education?

    Add to cart

Cart

Your Cart is Empty

Back To Shop