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J. Richard Middleton

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  • 4 Views On Heaven

    $20.99

    Discover Different Christian Views on What Heaven Will Be Like

    Christians from a variety of denominations and traditions are in middle of an important conversation about the final destiny of the saved. Scholars such as N. T. Wright and J. Richard Middleton have pushed back against the traditional view of heaven, and now some Christians are pushing back against them for fear that talk about the earthiness of our final hope distracts our attention from Jesus.

    In the familiar Counterpoints format, Four Views on Heaven brings together a well-rounded discussion and highlights similarities and differences of the current views on heaven. Each author presents their strongest biblical case for their position, followed by responses and a rejoinder that model a respectful and irenic tone toward those with whom they disagree.

    Positions and contributors include:

    *Heaven: John S. Feinberg. This traditional view says our destiny is to leave earth and live forever in heaven where we will rest, worship, and serve God. We cannot say much about what heaven is like because its pleasures and glory will far surpass anything experienced here. We will be perfect in every way, both morally and in our knowledge. This heavenly vision may seem boring, but only because we are considering heaven from our earthly perspective.

    *Earth: J. Richard Middleton. This position counters the popular Platonic notion of heaven by emphasizing that the saved will live forever with Jesus on this restored planet. Worshiping Jesus will be the climax of our experience, but we will also enjoy ordinary human activities in our redeemed state.

    *Heavenly Earth: Michael Allen. Increasing number of Protestant theologians disagree with the otherworldly Platonic vision of our final destiny but also suspect that Kuyperians have swung too far in the other direction. His view sounds like a Protestant version of the beatific vision. We will be on earth, but totally locked into Jesus in unceasing praise. This view seeks to highlight both the strengths and weaknesses of the heavenly and earthly views.

    *Roman Catholic Beatific Vision: Peter Kreeft. The beatific vision is the ultimate direct self communication of God to the individual. A person possessing the beatific vision reaches, as a member of redeemed humanity in the communion of saints, perfect salvation in its entirety, i.e. heaven. The notion of vision stresses the intellectual component of salvation, though it encompasses the whole of huma

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  • Abrahams Silence : The Binding Of Isaac, The Suffering Of Job, And How To T

    $49.99

    It is traditional to think we should praise Abraham for his willingness to sacrifice his son as proof of his love for God. But have we misread the point of the story? Is it possible that a careful reading of Genesis 22 could reveal God was not pleased with Abraham’s silent obedience?

    Widely respected biblical theologian, creative thinker, and public speaker J. Richard Middleton suggests we have misread and misapplied the story of the binding of Isaac and shows that God desires something other than silent obedience in difficult times. Middleton focuses on the ethical and theological problem of Abraham’s silence and explores the rich biblical tradition of vigorous prayer, including the lament psalms, as a resource for faith. Middleton also examines the book of Job in terms of God validating Job’s lament as “right speech,” showing how the vocal Job provides an alternative to the silent Abraham.

    This book provides a fresh interpretation of Genesis 22 and reinforces the church’s resurgent interest in lament as an appropriate response to God.

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  • Abrahams Silence : The Binding Of Isaac, The Suffering Of Job, And How To T

    $26.99

    It is traditional to think we should praise Abraham for his willingness to sacrifice his son as proof of his love for God. But have we misread the point of the story? Is it possible that a careful reading of Genesis 22 could reveal God was not pleased with Abraham’s silent obedience?

    Widely respected biblical theologian, creative thinker, and public speaker J. Richard Middleton suggests we have misread and misapplied the story of the binding of Isaac and shows that God desires something other than silent obedience in difficult times. Middleton focuses on the ethical and theological problem of Abraham’s silence and explores the rich biblical tradition of vigorous prayer, including the lament psalms, as a resource for faith. Middleton also examines the book of Job in terms of God validating Job’s lament as “right speech,” showing how the vocal Job provides an alternative to the silent Abraham.

    This book provides a fresh interpretation of Genesis 22 and reinforces the church’s resurgent interest in lament as an appropriate response to God.

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  • New Heaven And A New Earth

    $31.99

    In recent years, more and more Christians have come to appreciate the Bible’s teaching that the ultimate blessed hope for the believer is not an otherworldly heaven; instead, it is participation–through a resurrected soul and body–in a new heaven and a new earth brought into fullness under the transformation of God’s kingdom. Drawing on the full sweep of the biblical narrative, J. Richard Middleton unpacks key Old Testament and New Testament texts to make a case for the new earth as the appropriate Christian hope. He suggests its ethical and ecclesial implications, exploring the difference a holistic eschatology can make for living in a broken world.

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  • Truth Is Stranger Than It Used To Be

    $26.00

    In this book the authors survey postmodern culture and philosophy, offering lucid explanations of such difficult theories as deconstruction. They are sympathetic to the postmodern critique, yet believe that a gospel stripped of its modernist trappings speaks a radical world of hope and transformation to our chaotic culture. This book is for those who wonder what postmodernism is and how biblical Christians might best respond.

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